The Memory Pendulums

The Memory Pendulums was installed in May 2010 as part of the MEMORY FLOWS group exhibition at the Armory Gallery, Newington Armory, Sydney Olympic Park and is a project of the Centre for Media Arts Innovation, UTS. With special thanks to the Curators  Sophia Kouyoumdjian, Norie Neumark and Deborah Turnbull.

Further exhibition details are available from the CMAI website: http://www.communication.uts.edu.au/centres/cmai/projects/index.html

A motion sensitive sound Installation affected by contact and gravity, the Memory Pendulums modulate the spoken measure of a poem, written for the artwork by the Australian poet Jill Jones. Her words flow randomly in time with the playful swinging back and forth of three diamond shaped acrylic water pendulums. Each one filled to a different capacity with a toxic blue liquid, triggering a different memory, dripping into (and polluting) the muddy waters of the Parramatta River …..

Exhibition Dates / Every weekend from 15 May 2010 to 20 June 2010

Memory is referenced in two ways within the work. Through the use of 3 liquid filled pendulums which, like controlling the mechanism of a clock, control the listening of a poem over time. If the pendulums swing uninterrupted for approximately 90 seconds the listener will hear the entire poem, which in three parts takes all three pendulums to swing. The listener’s memory must be engaged in the experience or appreciation of the poem as it is more than likely with all three pendulums swinging the three parts will be heard simultaneously. Memory is also referenced literally throughout the poem, particularly the third part titled “River as memory”.

River as memory, by Jill Jones

where waters come from
clean as that mysterious rain
you never see
a source in the rock
from sea
cloud
sea

cycling planetary urges
the shiver of ancient degrees

death moves in circles
drinks at the ground
great birds
drift
in the flow’s shadow

making channels
and ridges
in our mud memory

memoryflows_invite

Play 109 @ Loop Space

Play 109 is an interactive sound, video and graffiti installation by Damian Castaldi & Solange Kershaw  in collaboration with the artist/programmer Neil Jenkins and Jake Lewis of the Amerg Collective.

play109_opening

Watch a video of the opening night as part of the Renew Newcastle first Friday of the month events in the Newcastle mall on the 4th of December 2009.

Play 109 the second in a series of interactive sound installations sodacake are installing in 2009/2010. The first, Play 44 was installed in Melbourne in October 2009 at the historic house, Villa Alba in Kew. Each installation transforms a different location (shopfront, historic house, gallery, mall etc …) into a musical instrument, which people can then engage with and play. The instrument changes uniquely in relation to the location and its surroundings and takes the number of the street address for the title of the work, (as in 109 Hunter St Newcastle and 44 Walmer St Kew).

An underlying influence in this series of sound installations comes from the late 1940’s and 1950’s movement known as Musique Concrète, in that its pioneer Pierre Schaeffer, “emphasized the importance of play (in his terms, jeu) in the creation of music. Schaeffer’s idea of jeu comes from the French verb jouer, which carries the same double meaning as the English verb play: ‘to enjoy oneself by interacting with one’s surroundings’, as well as ‘to operate a musical instrument’.” This notion is the core of Musique Concrète and the underlying influence to Play 109.

Coal Country, Newcastle East

c o a l – w i n e – f i s h – s a l t – w a t e r – s m o k e

Coal Country, Newcastle East

Coal Country detail ….

Coal Country predicts the effects of climate change on the Australian East coast landscape and from an aerial perspective, the sky above. The viewer flies over and listens to six https://www.viagrasansordonnancefr.com/ locations from the peninsula at Newcastle East, the vineyards at Wollombi, the inlet at the Hawkesbury River, the bay at Pretty Beach, the beach at Avalon and finally King street in Newtown where the work was originally conceived in 2008.

The six land and seascapes are distorted (stretched or warped) and show an interpretation of their satellite view. Within each, web like black broken lines twist into themselves

like a fracture in their earth’s structure. The cloudy skies above alter in hue from an aqua blue haze to violet and lime. Their discoloration is the pollution of our atmosphere(s).

Mounted below each panel are clear acrylic housings. Each of these contains a substance that is either produced by or of the location below and although each substance was gathered from that location it is not exclusive to it. The first five (coal to water) are the resources, fuel, food and drink we either depend on or consume and the last (smoke) is a bi-product of this consumption and

a consequence of both land and sea travel. That we are so dependent on these resources and fuels and consume them to the extent we do is a part of life. Consumption is not the problem; it is the bi-product of our consumer society, human induced climate change that is the focus of this work.